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A little of this, a half of that; add water and mash.

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The blog title is really all there is to making your own baby food for your little one!

 

I swore to myself I wouldnt’ be “that mom.” I’m not anal about Vaught’s outfits matching (I have no idea how to dress a baby, but I’m getting better). I didn’t try to keep him away from everything that breathes during cold and flu season. Did he get sick? Yeah, a little. Did he survive. Yep. I don’t Lysol my house every day (more like once a week, at best). AND DON’T EVEN GET ME STARTED ON PINTEREST BIRTHDAY PARTIES. So, why do I spend an hour every week making and storing Vaught’s solids? Because I’m determined to ensure the healthiest options for him as a baby and beyond.

Eric and I have talked about this since before Vaught was born: it’s important to us that Vaught eat healthily from the very beginning. We love eating wholesome, healthy food in our home (Eric just eats a lot more than I do), and we both want our son to see us eating this way so that he’ll be more adept at following suit when he’s older.

Eric and I were both raised on carbs, sugar, and high fructose corn syrup, but we can’t blame our parents at all. The parents of our generation weren’t obsessed with their kids’ diets and the pantry like parents are today. I don’t think we really knew that much about what all went into snack foods and drinks at that time like we do now. We want to be sure that Vaught’s getting the nutrients that he needs and what better way to do that than prepare his food myself from locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables?

There’s really not a science behind making your own food for baby. Mash things up or puree them in a blender with a little water, and you’re good to go! All I did before starting was a Web search on
how to properly store certain foods, like avocado, to ensure that they stay fresh and edible for baby.

I spend about $10 every couple of weeks on fruits/vegetables for his food; I haven’t bought a container of baby food in nearly two months!

Blueberries
Pour 1/4 cup of berries into a bowl and add a tablespoon of water. Microwave one minute then crush and stir with a fork OR: this actually works much better when put through the blender, as it crushes up the skin better. I don’t always like pulling the blender out though, so I do this with just a fork sometimes. I also like adding a bit of rice cereal to thicken.

Banana
Chop up 1/2 banana into a bowl and add water for desired consistency. Mash and stir with a fork. We freeze our banana mixture then set in the refrigerator to thaw. It can be warmed up pretty quickly in the microwave. Banana is the only thing we’ve tried that needs to be frozen if he doesn’t eat it right away.

Sweet Potato
Microwave or bake a sweet potato and spoon 1/2 into a bowl. Add water and mash to desired consistency.

Cut in half and spoon one half into a bowl. Add water and mash to desired consistency. To keep it from browning, squirt some lemon juice on top of what’s left before refrigerating. Try to eat avocados within a couple of days, as they ripen quickly!

All of these, aside from the banana, can be kept in the refrigerator for several days, but you will need to eat the avocado quickly. Freeze bananas then set out to thaw in the fridge. Banana can also be warmed up in the microwave pretty quickly. We’re going to try some new things like papaya, squash, and pears this week!

Vaught seems to like trying new flavors, and the only thing we’ve discovered that he dislikes is plain mashed potato. We are trying to stay away from sugar, high fructose corn syrup, salt, and cow’s milk until he’s about a year old. Does this mean I’m going to wig out when one of his sneaky grandparents gives him a taste of chocolate, kool-aid, fruit juice, or ice cream? No! That’s what grandparents are supposed to do! We were dining out at our favorite steakhouse a few weeks ago when I looked down the table to see my Dad giving Vaught a sip of Coke!

danny

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